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2019-05-29 - 2019-05-31

Transients in Biological Systems at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is now accepting applications for its Investigative Workshop, "Transients in Biological Systems," to be held May 29-31, 2019, at NIMBioS.

Objectives: Transients, or non-asymptotic dynamics, cover a wide range of possibilities, from biology to ecology and beyond. A full understanding of transients and their implications for biology requires mathematical and statistical developments as well as attention to biological detail. Transient dynamics have also played a central role in both empirical observations and in models in neuroscience. Yet interaction between ecologists and neuroscientists on this topic has been limited. Although epidemiology could be considered part of population biology, there is also less cross-talk between epidemiology and other areas of population biology than desirable. Transients clearly play a role in disease dynamics. Areas such as immune response require attention to transients as well.

Goals for the workshop:



Co-Organizers: Alan Hastings, Environmental Science and Policy, Univ. of California, Davis; Carl Boettiger, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Kim Cuddington, Biology, Univ. of Waterloo, Canada; Andrew Morozov, Mathematics, Univ. of Leicester, UK; and Sergei Petrovskii, Mathematics, Univ. of Leicester, UK

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_transients

Participation in NIMBioS workshops is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within two weeks after the application deadline. If needed, financial support for travel, meals, and lodging is available for workshop attendees.

Application deadline: January 30, 2019

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) (http://www.nimbios.org) brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is supported by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_transients
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2019-05-01 - 2019-05-03

Mathematics of Gun Violence at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is now accepting applications for its Investigative Workshop, "Mathematics of Gun Violence," to be held May 1-3, 2019, at NIMBioS.

Objectives: Gun violence is a central public concern in the United States, annually leading to the deaths of 31,000 individuals and the non-fatal injuries of 78,000 others. It has been called an epidemic and a public health crisis. For infectious disease epidemics and associated public health planning (including recent Zika and Ebola outbreaks), officials relied on mathematical models to evaluate immediate responses and develop preventative policies. The construction of policies to curb the spread of gun violence could benefit from the development of mathematical models linked with available data. This workshop will bring together researchers from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to (i) review the existing approaches on the mathematics and modeling of gun violence, (ii) identify and prioritize areas in the field that require further research, (iii) develop cross-disciplinary collaborations to gain new perspectives, and (iv) suggest research and data-collection that could assist evidence-based policy recommendations. A direct outcome from this workshop will be a comprehensive review of existing models on this topic with suggestions for further effort. It is expected that collaborations arising from the workshop will result in novel efforts to enhance the quantitative underpinnings of the science of gun violence.

The workshop will incorporate discussions and critiques of the existing approaches to gun violence modeling and how these relate to the objectives for which models could be developed. Comparisons of various modeling approaches (including dynamical systems, agent-based, spatial, and statistical) and the parameterization of these models will be considered. Through discussions of existing and future models, we will also assess the available data and suggest new data collection.. The workshop will consider the variety of scales at which models of this system can be developed and the associated implications at these different scales. The relationship to models for human behavior, including those from social psychology and game theory, will be evaluated.

Effective approaches to building a theory of gun violence, which will then inform a science of gun violence, will require perspectives from multiple disciplines. The workshop will consider a systems approach that bring together interacting factors and components operating on multiple scales of time and space. Attendees will incorporate ideas from various quantitative fields (including mathematics, computer science, statistics, and informatics), social science areas (including geography, psychology, and criminology), and biological disciplines (including behavior, medicine, and ecology). The necessary research will be informed by practitioners involved in policy and law enforcement and will account for ethical issues of social justice and privacy. An objective is to consider how models might inform potential interventions, communication formats, educational initiatives, and control methods.

The workshop will include presentations from participants, a poster session to indicate the diversity of methods currently being used in the field, and breakout groups on topics chosen with input from participants. Participants will be expected to contribute to a review outlining the current approaches identifying gaps in the literature, and presenting potential future directions.

Location: NIMBioS at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Co-Organizers: Andrea L. Bertozzi, Mathematics and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA
Louis J. Gross, Mathematics and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, NIMBioS, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville,
Andrew V. Papachristos, Sociology, Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern Univ.,
Shelby M. Scott, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville,
Martin B. Short, Mathematics, Georgia Tech

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_gunviolence

Participation in NIMBioS workshops is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within two weeks after the application deadline. If needed, financial support for travel, meals, and lodging is available for workshop attendees.

Application deadline: November 30, 2018

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) (http://www.nimbios.org) brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is supported by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_gunviolence
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2019-04-23 - 2019-04-25

Social Norms: Emergence, Persistence, and Effects at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

The Center for the Dynamics of Social Complexity (DySoC) is now accepting applications for its Investigative Workshop, Social Norms: Emergence, Persistence, and Effects, to be held April 23-25, 2019, at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS).

Objectives:
Human social behavior is controlled by many interacting factors including material cost-benefit considerations, genetically-informed social instincts, personality, and culturally transmitted norms, values, and institutions. A social norm is a behavior that one is expected to follow and expects others to follow in a given social situation. Understanding the emergence, persistence, and effects of social norms is crucial for developing better policies affecting the life of the society as a whole and of its individual members. This workshop brings together active scholars interested in various aspect of social norms in an attempt to stimulate new synergies, insights, and collaborations. We envision this meeting as a truly transdisciplinary gathering of researchers from diverse disciplines including sociology, anthropology, psychology, economics, evolutionary biology, cultural evolution, neurobiology, political science, history, and experts on extremism, marketing, communications, as well as policy scholars and practitioners.
Full details at http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_socialnorms

Location:
The Center for the Dynamics of Social Complexity at NIMBioS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Co-Organizers: Michele Gelfand (Psychology. Univ. of Maryland); Nathan Nunn (Economics, Harvard Univ.); Sergey Gavrilets (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, Univ. of Tennessee)

Invited Participants:
Jeannie Annan, International Rescue Committee; Robert Boyd, Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State Univ.; Colin Camerer, Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience, California Institute of Technology; Damon Centola, Annenberg School for Communication, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Jean Ensminger, Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology; Ernst Fehr, UBS International Center of Economics in Society, Univ. of Zurich; Jeremy Ginges, Psychology, New School of Social Research; Joseph Henrich, Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard Univ.; Karla Hoff*, Development Research Group, The World Bank; Shinobu Kitayama, Culture & Cognition Program, Univ. of Michigan; Maria Lapinski, Communication, Michigan State Univ.; Vera Mironova, Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School; Karine Nyborg*, Economics, Univ. of Oslo; Elizabeth Paluck, Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, Princeton Univ.; Alan Sanfey, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud Univ.; Agnis Stibe, Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Arne Traulsen, Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany [not yet confirmed]

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_socialnorms

Participation in NIMBioS workshops is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within several weeks after the application deadline. If needed, financial support for travel, meals, and lodging is available for workshop attendees.

Application deadline: December 1, 2018

The Center for the Dynamics of Social Complexity (DySoC) (http://www.dysoc.org) promotes connections and collaborations between different researchers using theoretical and empirical methods at the interface of mathematical, biological, social, and computational sciences to address the dynamics of social behavior.

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) (http://www.nimbios.org) brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_socialnorms
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2019-02-11 - 2019-02-15

Stochastic Models in Systems and Synthetic Biology at International Graduate School on Control, Paris-Saclay

In the context of the 2019 EECI International Graduate School on Control (co-sponsored by IFAC and IEEE Control Systems Society), Alessandro Borri and I (both from CNR-IASI, Rome, Italy) will teach a 1-week module (21 hours, 3 ECTS) in Paris-Saclay:

M06 - Stochastic models in Systems and Synthetic Biology, February 11-15, 2019

Deadline for advance registration: December 31, 2018.

The course will present some basic and advanced notions on the stochastic approach to Systems and Synthetic Biology and will illustrate important examples of applications, with main focus on modeling, control and simulation issues. An abstract of the course is provided in attachment.

Feel free to contact us or visit the web page for further information.

More information:
http://www.eeci-igsc.eu/
pasquale.palumbo@iasi.cnr.it, alessandro.borri@iasi.cnr.it


2018-12-06 - 2018-12-07

Viral Infections from an Evolutionary Perspective at Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS); Frankfurt-Main, Germany

We are happy to announce the workshop on "Viral Infections from an Evolutionary Perspective" to be held at FIAS in Frankfurt (Main) December 6-7, 2018.

For further information see the description below or visit https://www.math.uni-frankfurt.de/~pokalyuk/events.html .

If you would like to attend our workshop please register until November 30th by sending an e-mail to pokalyuk@math.uni-frankfurt.de giving your name and affiliation as well as the days at which you would like to attend.

We look forward to welcome you in Frankfurt!

Cornelia Pokalyuk (Goethe University, Frankfurt) and Christel Kamp (Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Langen)

Being highly dependent on their hosts viruses have evolved various strategies to coexist with them. For example, herpesviruses are capable to switch between states of latency and reactivation, and influenza viruses perform a permanent arms race with the immune systems of their hosts. The strategies of coexistence are reflected in different infection patterns, leading for example to lifelong host infections or short episodes of infection.
This workshop will bring together virologists and theoreticians to discuss which evolutionary models can be helpful to explain observed infection histories, and which medical consequences could result from these. The main focus will lie on infections caused by the cytomegalovirus, an ancient herpesvirus, and caused by bacteriophages, that is, viruses infecting bacteria.

More information:
https://www.math.uni-frankfurt.de/~pokalyuk/events.html
Christel.Kamp@pei.de


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