[1-5] [6-10] [11-15] [16-20] [21-25] [26-30] [31-35] [36-40] [41-45] [46-50] [51-55] [56-60] [61-65] [66-70] [71-75] [76-80] [81-85] [86-90] [91-95] [96-100]


2018-06-25 - 2018-06-27

Bio-acoustic Structure at NIMBioS at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is now accepting applications for its Investigative Workshop, 'Bio-acoustic Structure,' to be held June 25 through 27 at NIMBioS.

Objectives: Acoustic repertoires may serve as a central component for social cohesion, foraging, and reproduction; in turn, these sounds may reflect population or species boundaries for many taxa. As acoustic monitoring has increased in popularity, so has interest in using this data to identify population structure and quantify biological diversity. In cases where it is difficult to obtain other biological samples, acoustic data may be the only source of information from which population structure can be inferred. Historically, acoustic research on different taxa has proceeded independently, utilizing different features and developing different methods for classification or quantifying regional differences. Additionally, while it is clear that there is a genetic component to some bio-acoustic features, the degree to which they are shaped by the environment or can be used as a proxy for relatedness is still uncertain.

In order to make progress on the promise of using acoustics to characterize population structure, this workshop will bring together experts in bio-acoustics of multiple taxa, including birds, frogs, primates, and cetaceans, with mathematicians and computer scientists with expertise in classification, clustering, and information theory to develop a unified approach. This will be accomplished by: 1) compiling guidelines of best practices for designing acoustic surveys, 2) reviewing acoustic features of each taxon useful for identifying regional and taxonomic differences, and 3) reviewing methods for quantifying and comparing information content, generating classification models, and identifying biologically significant clusters. The results of this workshop will describe the current state of using acoustics to assess population structure, create a community bridging taxonomic disciplines, and provide new non-invasive tools for conservation.

Co-Organizers: Frederick Archer and Shannon Rankin, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/workshops/WS_bioacoustics

Participation in NIMBioS workshops is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within two weeks after the application deadline. If needed, financial support for travel, meals, and lodging is available for workshop attendees.

Application deadline: March 5, 2018

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org /
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2018-06-18 - 2018-06-22

The Search for Selection - Tutorial at NIMBioS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis [NIMBioS] is now accepting applications for its Tutorial, THE SEARCH FOR SELECTION, to be held June 18-22, 2018, at NIMBioS.

Objectives: Biologists are obsessed [indeed, seduced] by the search for signatures of selection in organismal features of interest, ranging from specific traits to genome-wide signatures. A vast number of approaches have been suggested in this search for selection, including genomic-based signatures of recent or ongoing selection, tests based on either excessive amounts or nonrandom patterns of divergence [in both fossil sequences and functional genomics data] and the more classical Lande-Arnold fitness estimates [direct association of phenotypic values with fitness estimates] and their modern extensions [such as aster models]. Given the breadth of such searches, a large amount of machinery has been developed, but is rarely presented in a unified fashion. This tutorial presents an integrated overview of all these approaches, highlighting common themes and divergent assumptions.

The goal of this tutorial is to expose investigators from all branches of biology to this rich menagerie of tests. It is applicable for population geneticists, genome biologists, evolutionary ecologists, paleontologists, functional morphologists, and just about any biologist who ponders on how to formally demonstrate that a feature [or features] of interest might have been shaped by selection.

The intended audience is advanced graduate students, postdocs, and faculty with an interest in searching for targets of selection, be they particular genomic sequences or particular traits. Given the breadth of this topic, we expect students from functional genomics, population and evolutionary genetics, ecology, paleobiology, functional morphology, and statistics [as well as other fields]. The background required is some basic introduction to population and/or quantitative genetics.

Co-Organizers: J. Bruce Walsh, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona

For more information about the tutorial and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/tutorials/selection

Participation in NIMBioS tutorials is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within several weeks after the application deadline. NIMBioS will cover lodging, 5 nights, and provide breakfast and lunch each day at NIMBioS. If needed, limited financial support for travel expenses is available.

Application deadline: February 1, 2018

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis [NIMBioS] brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2018-05-16 - 2018-05-18

Applications of Spatial Data: Ecological Niche Modeling - Tutorial at NIMBioS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

Objectives:
The distribution of a species may be influenced by an array of factors. The combination of these factors results in the ecological niche, the set of conditions that allow a species to exist in a geographic area. However, defining these conditions is difficult, due to the complexity of natural systems. One approach to characterizing the ecological niche uses spatial data GIS software. The objectives of this tutorial are to teach participants the concepts of ecological niche modeling, introduce them to select analytical techniques (formatting data in GIS; running Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models), and present how to interpret and apply spatial analyses. Participants will further be familiarized with several commonly-used and/or newly-available online spatial data resources. Participants will be provided datasets to use in hands-on simulations, but can also bring their own data if desired.

This tutorial is intended for advanced graduate students, postdocs, and faculty who are interested in learning how to incorporate ecological niche modeling into their research. Some basic knowledge of GIS software and ecology is preferred. Little to no programming will be involved, with ecological niche modeling and spatial analysis conducted using existing applications (MaxEnt) and packages in QGIS and R.

Co-organizers:
Mona Papes, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Director, Spatial Analysis Lab at NIMBioS; Greg Wiggins, NIMBioS

Instructors:
Mona Papes; Greg Wiggins; Town Peterson, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity Institute, Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS; Xiao Feng, Institute of the Environment, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

For more information about the tutorial and a link to the online application form, go to http://www.nimbios.org/tutorials/SpatialDataENM

Participation in NIMBioS tutorials is by application only. Individuals with a strong interest in the topic are encouraged to apply, and successful applicants will be notified within several weeks after the application deadline. Lodging, breakfast and lunch will be provided for tutorial attendees.

Application deadline: February 15, 2018

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. NIMBioS is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

More information:
http://www.nimbios.org
ccrawley@nimbios.org


2018-05-14 - 2018-05-18

ICTP-SAIFR Workshop on Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Ecological Networks at IFT-UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Description:

Network theory has become a fundamental tool to study and analyze complex systems. In the field of ecology, in particular, the application of these new methods has led to tremendous progress, increasing our knowledge of the assembly and dynamics of ecological communities. Many questions, however, remain open, especially those requiring the integration of ecological processes that operate over spatial and temporal scales. This workshop will bring together a diverse group of scientists spanning the fields of biology, physics, mathematics and computation to focus on these questions. The group will develop working hypotheses for factors driving network dynamics based on empirical patterns; explore case studies of variation across space or time in ecological networks; develop new models of network dynamics incorporating coevolution and community ecology; develop models to link ecology to macroevolutionary processes.

During the workshop participants will be organized in groups to work on specific projects of common interest. There will be one introductory talk every morning, before the groups start working, and one more technical talk in the afternoon. There is no registration fee.

Organizers:



Invited Speakers:



Registration deadline: March 16, 2018

More information:
http://www.ictp-saifr.org/econet18
jandira@ictp-saifr.org


2018-05-02 - 2018-05-04

Dynamics of biological systems: Modelling genetic, signalling and microbial networks at ULB, Campus Plaine, Brussels, B.

The Solvay- Workshop aims to bring together leading scientists who study, through computational modelling, the role of networks in the dynamics of biological systems. It will focus on the multidisciplinary efforts made by researchers to understand the basic mechanisms by which interacting organisms, cells, signalling molecules and genes can give rise to the specific, highly organized characteristics of biological systems.

The workshop will be divided in five sessions, for each topic, it is expected that the theoretical, analytical or computational approach will provide significant biological insight, through a close link with experimental approaches. The cross-disciplinary exchange of ideas between the participants of the various sessions will benefit all researchers using network science to understand how living systems organize and adapt.

Attendance is free of charge but registration is required (limited space).

To register, please go to the following site by April 17, 2018:

http://www.solvayinstitutes.be/event/workshop/dynamics_2018/registration.php

Name badges and WIFI codes will be distributed on site on Wednesday 2 May from 8:30 a.m.

POSTER SESSION: A poster session will be organized on Thursday May 3. Poster presentation from attendees is strongly encouraged.

The workshop will be held at the Free University of Brussels (ULB) - Campus Plaine - Bld de la Plaine - 1050 Brussels (Building N.O. - 5th Floor - Solvay Room).


Attendees will have to arrange and pay for their own travel, accommodation, and subsistence costs. For further details on lodging or schedule, please go to the following website:

http://www.solvayinstitutes.be/event/workshop/dynamics_2018/dynamics_2018.html

More information:
http://www.solvayinstitutes.be/event/workshop/dynamics_2018/dynamics_2018.html
isabelle.vangeet@solvayinstitutes.be


[1-5] [6-10] [11-15] [16-20] [21-25] [26-30] [31-35] [36-40] [41-45] [46-50] [51-55] [56-60] [61-65] [66-70] [71-75] [76-80] [81-85] [86-90] [91-95] [96-100]